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Elizabeti’s School

Title: Elizabeti’s School

Bibliographic information: Stuve-Bodeen, S. (2002). Elizabeti’s School. New York: Lee & Low Books

Brief annotation: Elizabeti is starting school and she is so excited. She really enjoys her first day but she misses her family. Would she be better off at home with them?

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Grade: 1st – 3rd

Readers who will like this: This book would be good for students who may be afraid  to go to school and leave their families. This would be a good book for the first day of school.

Rating: 4 – I really enjoyed this story. It showed what the first day of school is like in another culture, which isn’t much different than here. Readers can make connections between what their first day was like and how Elizabeti’s was similar or different.

Questions: How did you feel on your first day of school? What was your favorite thing from that day?

Learning strategy: I chose the Writer’s Chair  for this book because students can write the story of their first day of school and then have the opportunity to read it to the class.

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My Two Grannies

Title: My Two Grannies

Bibliographic information: Benjamin, F. (2007). My Two Grannies. London: Frances Lincoln Children’s Books

Brief annotation: Alvina loves spending time with both of her grandmothers but when they both take care of her for a week they can’t agree on anything. Alvina finds a way for both grannies to share their stories and traditions.

Genre: Realistic fiction picture book

Grade: 1st – 3rd

Readers who will like this: Readers who enjoy family traditions and have diverse family backgrounds will enjoy this book.

Rating: 4 – I really enjoyed this story. I liked that it showed that that no matter where your family comes from, you have traditions and they will differ from family to family.

Questions: What are some of you favorite family traditions?

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Nino Wrestles the World

Title: Nino Wrestles the World

Bibliographic Information: Morales, Y. (2013). Nino wrestles the world. New York: Roaring Book Press.

Annotation: Nino is quite a very talented character. He is a popsicle eater, toy lover, somersault expert, and world champion lucha libre competitor. No opponent is too big or challenging for Nino, until he decides to take on his sister.

Genre: Juvenile fiction

Grade level: 1st – 5th Grade

Readers who will like this book: Readers who love action and reading about fun, brave, and outgoing characters will enjoy this book.

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because Nino is an exciting and fun character to read about. The pages in the book are well illustrated and vibrant. I think it is a fun book for all children. If you can’t defeat them, join them!

Question I would ask before the reading: Do you ever want to become a wrestler?

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The People Could Fly

Title: The People Could Fly

Bibliographic Information: Hamilton, V. (2004). The people could fly. New York: Alfred K. Knopf.

Annotation: The People Could Fly is about slavery and the many people who were able to escape. One man could not see his friends being mistreated any longer, so one by one he whispers the magic words and they fly to freedom.

Genre: Folktale

Grade level: 3rd – 6th Grade

Readers who will like this book: Readers who are interested in learning about slavery, enjoy folktales, and have interest in history will like this book.

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because it is very inspirational. This book includes beautiful illustrations and is an encouraging story. This would be a great book to use in your class when learning about slavery. I also love the concept of being able to “fly,” it is a good way to express freedom.

Question I would ask before the reading: What do you know about slavery?

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Your Move

Title: Your Move

Bibliographic Information: Bunting, E. (1998). Your move. Singapore: Harcourt Inc.

Annotation: James is a ten year old boy who tries to be cool enough to hang out with the group, K-Bones. James and his younger brother, Isaac, later discover that K-Bones is a gang. James realizes he puts his younger brother in danger. The story ends with courage and responsibility when James declines his admittance to the K-Bones gang and remains a role model for his little brother.

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Grade level: 4th – 6th Grade

Readers who will like this book: Readers who are trying to find “themselves” will enjoy this book. Readers who are discoveringwho their true friends are will appreciate this book.

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because it is very powerful and sensitive. It shows the reader to be true to yourself and your family. James was under pressure, which a lot of kids face today, but he made the right decision. I also loved all of the illustrations in this book.  

Question I would ask before the reading: Do you have a younger sibling or close friend that you look after closely?

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We Are the Ship: The Story of The Negro League

We Are the Ship: The Story of The Negro League

Nelson, K. (2008). We Are the Ship: The Story of The Negro League. New York, New York: Jump at The Sun/Hyperion Books for Children

A story about the Negro League baseball team from the beginning in the 1920s to when Jackie Robinson went to the Major Leagues in 1940.

Non-fiction

3rd-5th

Readers who enjoy baseball; Reader who like to read about the Negro League; Readers who like to read about Jackie Robinson

Rate:5; I really enjoyed this book love hearing about the African American history. The illustrations were amazing, really helped the story come to life.

Question: What do you know about the Negro league baseball team.

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Legend of the Blue Bonnet

Legend of the Blue Bonnet

de’Paula, T. (1983) Legend of the Blue Bonnet. New York, Ny: Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers.

A Camonche Indian legend of how a young girl brought the bluebonnet flower to Texas.

Folktale

1st-4th

Readers who like to read folktales; Readers who like flowers; Readers who enjoy indian culture.

Rating: 4; the illustrations were very elaborate. I enjoyed hearing some traditions of the Camonche indians.

Question: What do you think is so important about the Bluebonnet?