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Nino Wrestles the World

Title: Nino Wrestles the World

Bibliographic Information: Morales, Y. (2013). Nino wrestles the world. New York: Roaring Book Press.

Annotation: Nino is quite a very talented character. He is a popsicle eater, toy lover, somersault expert, and world champion lucha libre competitor. No opponent is too big or challenging for Nino, until he decides to take on his sister.

Genre: Juvenile fiction

Grade level: 1st – 5th Grade

Readers who will like this book: Readers who love action and reading about fun, brave, and outgoing characters will enjoy this book.

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because Nino is an exciting and fun character to read about. The pages in the book are well illustrated and vibrant. I think it is a fun book for all children. If you can’t defeat them, join them!

Question I would ask before the reading: Do you ever want to become a wrestler?

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The Whale who Ate Everything

Title: The Whale who Ate Everything

Bibliographic Information: Devoe, D (2012) The whale who ate everything. Canada: EH Plus Publishing.

Annotation: A very hungry blue whales eats everything he can find in the sea. The more he eats, the bigger he gets, and then all of a sudden the whale attempts to eat a boat.

Genre: Children’s Fiction Picturebook

Grade level: Kindergarten – 2nd Grade

Readers who will like this book: Readers who like fun books about whales will enjoy this book.

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because it is a cute book with fun illustrations. The captions from the other animals were fun to read too.

Question I would ask before the reading: Do you know what whales eat?

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Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus

Title: Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus

Bibliographic Information: Park, B (1992). Junie b. jones and the stupid smelly bus. New York: Random House Childrens Books.

Annotation: Junie is so scared to ride the bus on her first day of Kindergarten after she hears many scary rumors about what goes on there from her friends. So, instead of going on the bus after school is over, she decides to hide in her teacher’s closet. A janitor finds Junie., and she explains to her mother why she did it and what exactly she did.

Genre: Realistic Fiction – Comedy/Humor

Grade level: 2nd-5th Grade

Readers who will like this book: Readers who are looking for a fun and entertaining read will enjoy this book. Also, readers who enjoy reading about brave and outgoing characters will love the Junie B. series.

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because it is such a fun and entertaining read. Junie B. Jones and the Stupid Smelly Bus is the first book of this fun series. For this series I think it would be best for the students to read with an adult. Therefore the adult can explain what it is going on and correct some of the language Junie B. Jones uses. I can see where some parents would be concerned about their child reading this series. The series should not be banned. The language, grammar, and the decisions Junie B. Jones uses is what makes the series worthy and entertaining.

Question I would ask before the reading: Were you nervous to ride the school bus on your first day of school?

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The People Could Fly

Title: The People Could Fly

Bibliographic Information: Hamilton, V. (2004). The people could fly. New York: Alfred K. Knopf.

Annotation: The People Could Fly is about slavery and the many people who were able to escape. One man could not see his friends being mistreated any longer, so one by one he whispers the magic words and they fly to freedom.

Genre: Folktale

Grade level: 3rd – 6th Grade

Readers who will like this book: Readers who are interested in learning about slavery, enjoy folktales, and have interest in history will like this book.

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because it is very inspirational. This book includes beautiful illustrations and is an encouraging story. This would be a great book to use in your class when learning about slavery. I also love the concept of being able to “fly,” it is a good way to express freedom.

Question I would ask before the reading: What do you know about slavery?

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Your Move

Title: Your Move

Bibliographic Information: Bunting, E. (1998). Your move. Singapore: Harcourt Inc.

Annotation: James is a ten year old boy who tries to be cool enough to hang out with the group, K-Bones. James and his younger brother, Isaac, later discover that K-Bones is a gang. James realizes he puts his younger brother in danger. The story ends with courage and responsibility when James declines his admittance to the K-Bones gang and remains a role model for his little brother.

Genre: Realistic Fiction

Grade level: 4th – 6th Grade

Readers who will like this book: Readers who are trying to find “themselves” will enjoy this book. Readers who are discoveringwho their true friends are will appreciate this book.

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because it is very powerful and sensitive. It shows the reader to be true to yourself and your family. James was under pressure, which a lot of kids face today, but he made the right decision. I also loved all of the illustrations in this book.  

Question I would ask before the reading: Do you have a younger sibling or close friend that you look after closely?

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PINK and SAY

Title: Pink and Say

Bibliographic Information: Polacco, P. (1994). Pink and say. New York: Philomel Books.

Annotation: Say tries to escape his unit, but ends up getting wounded and is rescued by his good friend Pink. Pink carries him back to home in Georgia where he and his family were slaves. After Say is treated, Pink is very adamant on returning to the war. Both boys fight against slavery, unfortunately Pink does not survive but Say survives and shares the remarkable story about Pink.

Genre: Historical Fiction

Grade level: 4th – 6th Grade

Readers who will like this book: Readers who love true stories about heroes from our past will really enjoy this story. Also readers who have a passion for history will appreciate the story about Pink and Say.

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because it is based off of a true story and gives the reader a good insight of what life was like during the Civil War. This book is fairly lengthy, but is very entertaining, descriptive, and provides good illustrations throughout the book.

Question I would ask before the reading: What do you know about the Civil War?

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Llama Llama Red Pajama

Title: Llama Llama Red Pajama

Bibliographic Information: Dewdney, A. (2005). Llama llama red pajama. New York: Penguin Young Readers Group.

Annotation: One night Llama worries a lot about his Mama after she tucks in Llama Llama red pajama for bed. Llama’s worrying escalates to the point where Mama has to return back to Llama’s bedroom to comfort him.  

Genre: Poetry Picturebook

Grade level: Kindergarten – 3rd Grade

Readers who will like this book: Young readers who get scared when they are separated from their parents/guardians will enjoy this book. Llama is an impatient character but his Mama comforts him and explains the she is near and can be counted on, but sometimes there is Mama business that she gets busy with. Readers who need a little more of a push when it comes to separation will appreciate this book.

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because it deals with separation anxiety. Llama reassures to all readers that your parents/guardian will always return. The book keeps the reader intrigued because you want to know what Llama will do next. This book provides wonderful painted illustrations. A fun bedtime story!

Question I would ask before the reading: Have you ever felt scared after being tucked into bed?

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Wemberly Worried

Title: Wemberly Worried

Bibliographic Information: Henkes, K. (2000). Wemberly worried. Hong Kong: Greenwillow Books.

Annotation: Wemberly worried about every little thing. Wemberly worried about her friends, her birthday, family, the activities she participated in, and more. Once Wemberly started school she learned not to be so worried all of the time.

Genre: Picture book, Realistic Animal fiction

Grade level: Kindergarten – 3rd Grade

Readers who will like this book: Young readers who have the tendency to worry more than they should will enjoy this book. Hopefully this book well help the reader not worry so much about the little things.

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because I could relate to it and I think many readers can. I worry all of the time but more than half of the time it is not even necessary. Wemberly is a fun and interesting character who is enjoyable to read about.  

Question I would ask before the reading: What are some things you worry about?

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The Lion & the Mouse

Title: The Lion & the Mouse

Bibliographic Information: Pinkney, J. (2009). The lion and the mouse. New York: Little, Brown and Co. Books for Young Readers.

Annotation: This book illustrates how the mouse ends up saving the lion. It is a wordless picture book with very detailed pictures by Pinkney.

Genre: Folklore – Fable

Grade level: Kindergarten – 3rd Grade

Readers who will like this book: Young readers who love animals and enjoy books filled with pictures will appreciate this book.

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because the illustrations are wonderful and extremely detailed. There is so much to look at on each page. It is also twisting; I think the majority of the readers assume the lion will eat the mouse.

Question I would ask before the reading: How do you think lions treat mice?

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Sacagawea

Title: Sacagawea

Bibliographic Information: Witteman, B. (2002). Sacagawea. Minnesota: Bridgestone Books.

Annotation: This book focuses on the life Sacagawea lived. It is very detailed on her journeys and the legacy Sacagawea left behind.

Genre: Historical Fiction

Grade level: 2nd – 3rd Grade

Readers who will like this book: Readers who are looking for more information and pictures on Sacagawea will enjoy this book.  

Personal response/rating: I rate this book a 5, because it is well organized and provides important facts about Sacagawea. I also like how pictures are on every page to help the reader make a connection with the content.  

Question I would ask before the reading: Have you ever heard of Sacagawea before?

Reading Strategy:

For this book I would use the Quilts (Tompkins, p. 103) reading strategy. Each student would be asked to complete a square to add to our class quilt. Our class quilt will be representing Sacagawea. The squares will include background information on Sacagawea, her journeys, and the legacy she left behind. This reading strategy is necessary for this book because students will analyze how visual elements contribute to meaning and students will integrate information presented in formats to understand the importance of Sacagawea.